One Rep Max Chart: How Much You Can Lift?

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I have below a One Rep Max Chart along with information so you can learn what a 1 rep max chart is, why it’s useful, and how to read the chart.

What is a One Rep Max Chart?

One Rep Max ChartA 1 Rep Max Chart gives you a rough estimate of the number of reps and the amount of weight that corresponds to the maximum amount of weight that you can lift.  The chart works by assuming that the number of reps you can lift a certain weight can be predicted using mathematical relationships.

Why Is A One Rep Max Chart Useful?

One of the most frequent frustrations guys express to me is having no idea how much weight they can lift for a given number of repetitions.

So for example, if you can bench 175lb for 10 reps, then what should you try to bench if you are shooting for 6 reps?

Using a 1 Rep Max Chart is an effective way to make the process of calculating the amount of weight you should be using for a given number of reps more methodical.  In addition, if you are curious how much weight you can lift for only one rep (your max lift), instead of putting yourself at risk for serious injury, you can shoot for 6 reps then use a 1 rep chart to estimate your 1 rep max.  No need to put yourself in the hospital attempting to lift weight that’s too heavy.

This 1 rep max chart is not perfect because (1) some exercises may correspond better to the chart then others and (2) your strength and endurance levels can effect the number of reps you complete for a given amount of weight that may be above, or below the amount predicted.  Overall, the 1RM chart is a great guideline to help you increase your weights over time to properly progress your workouts.

In fact, when I was a college athlete, all of our strength training programs were based on our 1RM for a given lift, which we figured out by completing 6 reps with all of the basic lifts (squat, bench etc.).  Most advanced strength programs for athletes are based on 1RM and build in progressions so that the workout program forces strength increases over time.  Reps for a given workout can vary dramatically from 15 reps to as low as 2, or 3 reps, but this is the extreme.

How To Read The One Rep Max Chart

The left hand column has the 1 rep max whereas the numbers in the right hand columns represent how much weight can be lifted for the specified number of reps (reps are listed in the top row).

For example, find the 135lb max on the left, the scroll across the columns.  If you can lift 99lb for 12 reps, that corresponds to roughly a 135lb max.  A lift of 119lb for 4 reps also corresponds to a 135lb max.

The chart below uses the Brzycki Formula after its creator, Matt Brzycki, but is still very close to the “old school” strength chart based on percentages, which is still commonly used. The percentage chart is based on a linear relationship such that 10 reps corresponds to 75% of your max.  Every 1 rep change corresponds to +/- 2.5% change in the amount of weight that can be lifted.  For example, 10 reps of 135lb (75% of max lift) corresponds to a 180lb max and 6 reps of 135lb (85% of max lift) is a 158lb max. 

For more 1 rep max formulas, check out this page: 1 rep max formulas

max/reps 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2
50 36 37 38 38 39 41 42 43 44 45 47
55 39 40 41 42 43 45 46 47 49 50 52
60 43 44 45 46 47 49 50 51 53 55 56
65 46 48 49 50 51 53 54 56 57 59 61
70 50 51 53 54 55 57 58 60 62 64 66
75 54 55 56 58 59 61 63 64 66 68 70
80 57 59 60 62 63 65 67 69 71 73 75
85 61 62 64 65 67 69 71 73 75 77 80
90 64 66 68 69 71 73 75 77 79 82 84
95 68 70 71 73 75 77 79 81 84 86 89
100 71 73 75 77 79 81 83 86 88 91 94
105 75 77 79 81 83 85 88 90 93 95 98
110 79 80 83 85 87 89 92 94 97 100 103
115 82 84 86 88 91 93 96 99 101 105 108
120 86 88 90 92 95 97 100 103 106 109 113
125 89 91 94 96 99 101 104 107 110 114 117
130 93 95 98 100 103 105 108 111 115 118 122
135 96 99 101 104 107 109 113 116 119 123 127
140 100 102 105 108 111 114 117 120 124 127 131
145 104 106 109 112 114 118 121 124 128 132 136
150 107 110 113 115 118 122 125 129 132 136 141
155 111 113 116 119 122 126 129 133 137 141 145
160 114 117 120 123 126 130 133 137 141 145 150
165 118 121 124 127 130 134 138 141 146 150 155
170 121 124 128 131 134 138 142 146 150 155 159
175 125 128 131 135 138 142 146 150 154 159 164
180 129 132 135 138 142 146 150 154 159 164 169
185 132 135 139 142 146 150 154 159 163 168 173
190 136 139 143 146 150 154 158 163 168 173 178
195 139 143 146 150 154 158 163 167 172 177 183
200 143 146 150 154 158 162 167 171 176 182 188
205 146 150 154 158 162 166 171 176 181 186 192
210 150 154 158 162 166 170 175 180 185 191 197
215 154 157 161 165 170 174 179 184 190 195 202
220 157 161 165 169 174 178 183 189 194 200 206
225 161 165 169 173 178 182 188 193 199 205 211
230 164 168 173 177 182 186 192 197 203 209 216
235 168 172 176 181 186 191 196 201 207 214 220
240 171 176 180 185 189 195 200 206 212 218 225
245 175 179 184 188 193 199 204 210 216 223 230
250 179 183 188 192 197 203 208 214 221 227 234
255 182 187 191 196 201 207 213 219 225 232 239
260 186 190 195 200 205 211 217 223 229 236 244
265 189 194 199 204 209 215 221 227 234 241 248
270 193 198 203 208 213 219 225 231 238 245 253
275 196 201 206 212 217 223 229 236 243 250 258
280 200 205 210 215 221 227 233 240 247 255 263
285 204 209 214 219 225 231 238 244 251 259 267
290 207 212 218 223 229 235 242 249 256 264 272
295 211 216 221 227 233 239 246 253 260 268 277
300 214 220 225 231 237 243 250 257 265 273 281
305 218 223 229 235 241 247 254 261 269 277 286
310 221 227 233 238 245 251 258 266 274 282 291
315 225 230 236 242 249 255 263 270 278 286 295
320 229 234 240 246 253 259 267 274 282 291 300
325 232 238 244 250 257 264 271 279 287 295 305
330 236 241 248 254 261 268 275 283 291 300 309
335 239 245 251 258 264 272 279 287 296 305 314
340 243 249 255 262 268 276 283 291 300 309 319
345 246 252 259 265 272 280 288 296 304 314 323
350 250 256 263 269 276 284 292 300 309 318 328
355 254 260 266 273 280 288 296 304 313 323 333
360 257 263 270 277 284 292 300 309 318 327 338
365 261 267 274 281 288 296 304 313 322 332 342
370 264 271 278 285 292 300 308 317 326 336 347
375 268 274 281 288 296 304 313 321 331 341 352
380 271 278 285 292 300 308 317 326 335 345 356
385 275 282 289 296 304 312 321 330 340 350 361
390 279 285 293 300 308 316 325 334 344 355 366
395 282 289 296 304 312 320 329 339 349 359 370
400 286 293 300 308 316 324 333 343 353 364 375

I encourage you to try this chart out and see how it corresponds to your actual lifts.  Let me know how it goes by leaving a comment.

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11 Comments on “One Rep Max Chart: How Much You Can Lift?

  1. Vu
    April 18, 2012 #

    Cool, that thing is pretty dead on… I usually do 185 for 5 reps, my max is 215..

  2. Peter
    July 2, 2012 #

    Is there any difference in results between a workout of less reps with more weights vs a workout of more reps with less weights?

    1. July 2, 2012 #

      @Peter – there is a huge difference. One of our contributors Kevin Deeth is working on an article, which discusses the difference between high reps vs. low reps. In short, low reps (1-6) are good for increasing neuromuscular strength, 8-12 for hypertrophy (or creating a stimulus for the muscle to grow), and above 12 using lighter weights helps muscular endurance. These last two ranges are not set in stone, but are good guidelines to follow. I don’t go much below 6 reps anymore, because I just don’t think it’s necessary and the risk/reward ratio is not compelling, but I would say somewhere between 8-15 is the sweet spot where I would recommend you do most of your workouts.

  3. Shane
    August 18, 2012 #

    Very helpful Marc! I’m in my mid-30s and weigh 110lb with a waist of 29in. I’ve always found it difficult to bulk up due to my high metabolism and I’ve always been unsure about how many weights I should be lifting. The only free weights I’ve been using for a few years now have plates up to 18kg (40lb) while the barbell pole weighs about 7kg (15lb). In all it’d be about 25kg (55lb) I’m lifting. So I tested myself doing a bench press and couldn’t much lift after 29-30 reps. According to this chart then my 1RM is about 110lb, which I reckon is fairly accurate having checked some online calculators that allowed beyond 20 reps for calculation. So thanks again for your excellent research and advice!

    1. August 23, 2012 #

      @Shane – Thanks!

      1. Gene
        September 4, 2012 #

        What is a good guide to follow regarding knowing when it’s time to recalculate your 1 rep max. Some people say that if you can do more than 10 reps with 80% of your 1 rep max it’s time to recalculate. Does that mean once you can do more than 10 reps with 80% for 1 set or multiple sets ( 3).? Thanks

      2. September 5, 2012 #

        @Gene – 1 set, your first set.

  4. Tyler
    September 4, 2012 #

    How many sets should you be able to do at certain reps and percentages? Example: Should you be able to squat 4×5 at 85% or are you only supposed to be able to do one set of five at 85%?

    1. September 6, 2012 #

      @Tyler – That’s a great question and the answer requires a little bit of explaining. Using a one rep max chart, 85% is equivalent to 6 reps. Let’s say you can bench 225lb for 6 reps, so your max is roughly 270lb. It is not expected that you can do 225lb of 6 reps, rest 1 minute, then do another for 6 reps. You’ll probably get somewhere around 2-3 reps. Typically, it takes 5 minutes of rest in between sets to recover to max, or near max strength. That’s why powerlifters take such long breaks in between their lifts. The topic of rest between sets is easily worthy of a separate post, so I’ll make sure to write one.

      I’m assuming you don’t want to be a powerlifter, but do want to get strong and fit. With this in mind, you have a couple primary options if you are concerned about lifting hard and heavy. First, keeping with the above example, you choose 210lb and complete 5 sets of 5 reps with maybe 2-3 minutes rest between sets. See if you get all 5 reps on all 5 sets. If you do, you can increase the weight. This is classic 5×5 training. Second, you can use a pyramid structure where you start out with let’s say 205lb, get 10 reps, then increase the weight and decrease the reps. By the time you get to 225lb, you may only get 3-4 reps. How much weight you can lift depends on a number of factors, with rest between sets being a very significant factor. Hope this is helpful!

  5. September 10, 2012 #

    Hey everyone,
    I got a quick question for someone,because the chart is a little confusing for me.If I weigh 240,and am able to do 195 pounds 5 sets of 10 reps in 45 minutes,then what would my max be..?I’m unsure..I need a clarification,and extremely curious,since one mans 1 RM was 270 according to the comment.
    Thanks,
    Shane

    1. September 12, 2012 #

      @shanediddy – I think the confusion is from the idea that your 1 rep max is your MAX EFFORT for a certain number of reps. So instead of doing 195lb for 5 sets for 10 reps, my guess is you could do 195lb for a max effort of 13-14 reps. Then you take the 195lb and the 13 reps, apply it to the chart, and you get a rough estimate of your one rep max.

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